GULLIVERS TRAVELS LECTURE IN HINDI URDU|HANDOUTS |NOTES

GULLIVERS TRAVELS LECTURE IN HINDI URDU|HANDOUTS |NOTES

 

On this voyage, Gulliver goes to the sea as a surgeon on the merchant ship, Antelope. The ship is destroyed during a heavy windstorm, and Gulliver, the only survivor, swims to a nearby island, Lilliput. Being nearly exhausted from the ordeal, he falls asleep. Upon awakening, he finds that the island’s inhabitants, who are no larger than six inches tall, have captured him. After the inhabitants examine Gulliver and provide him with food, the Emperor of this country orders his subjects to move Gulliver to a little-used temple, the only place large enough to house him.

Analysis of the Gulliver’s travels

In this first chapter, Swift establishes Gulliver’s character. He does this primarily by the vast number of details that he tells us about Gulliver. Clearly, Gulliver is of good and solid — but unimaginative — English stock. Gulliver was born in Nottinghamshire, a sedate county without eccentricity. He attended Emmanuel College, a respected, but not dazzling, college. The neighborhoods that Gulliver lived in — Old Jury, Fetter Lane, and Wrapping — are all lower-middle-class sections. He is, in short, Mr. British middle class of his time.

GULLIVERS TRAVELS LECTURE IN HINDI URDU|HANDOUTS |NOTES

 

Gulliver is also, as might be expected, “gullible.” He believes what he is told. He is an honest man, and he expects others to be honest. This expectation makes for humor — and also for irony. We can be sure that what Gulliver tells us will be accurate. And we can also be fairly sure that Gulliver does not always understand the meaning of what he sees. The result is a series of astonishingly detailed, dead-pan scenes. For example, Gulliver gradually discovers, moving from one exact detail to another, that he is a prisoner of men six inches tall.

Concerning the political application of this chapter, note that Gulliver is confined in a building that was emptied because a notorious murder was committed there. The building probably represents Westminster Hall, where Charles I was tried and sentenced to death. It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gulliver’s Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club, made up of such notables as Pope, Arbuthnot, and Gay, proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific, and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swift’s was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of the Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed what was to become a children’s classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece.

Swift kept the form of the voyage book but expanded his target. Instead of simply parodying voyage literature, he decided to attack what he considered were people’s most conspicuous vices. He makes the abstract become concrete. Ideas are metamorphosed into grotesque, foreign creatures; absurd customs are represented by absurd objects; and the familiar becomes new and surprising.